Funding Opportunities

This is a list of Funding Opportunites curated for research interests in HPS. Please use the text boxes do to a keyword search and narrow your search, if needed. The list is maintained by Katy Schmitz, Senior Research Analyst, and if you are interested in applying to any of these funding opportunities, reach out to her at katy.schmitz@unt.edu or 940-565-2237.

Sponsor Deadline Sponsor Program Title Date posted
Wednesday, May 5, 2021 William T. Grant Foundation Research Grants on Reducing Inequality

Officer's research awards are up to $50,000.

Major research awards are $100,000-$600,000.

Deadlines are January 13, 2021; May 5, 2021; and August 4, 2021.

The Foundation’s mission is to support research to improve the lives of young people ages 5-25 in the United States. Successful projects will build stronger bodies of knowledge on how to reduce inequality in the United States and to move beyond the mounting research evidence about the scope, causes, and consequences of inequality.The sponsor seeks studies that aim to build, test, or increase under-standing of programs, policies, or practices to reduce inequality in the academic, social, behavioral, or economic outcomes of young people. They will prioritize studies about reducing inequality on the basis of race, ethnicity, economic standing, language minority status, or immigrant origins.

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Nov 18, 2020
Tuesday, May 25, 2021 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) AHRQ Health Services Research Demonstration and Dissemination Grants (R18)

Awards are a maximum of $400,000 direct costs per year for up to five (5) years.

Deadlines are January 25th, May 25th, and September 25th through September 25, 2022.

The Research Demonstration and Dissemination Grant (R18) is an award made by AHRQ to an institution/organization to support a discrete, specified health services research project. The R18 research plan proposed by the applicant institution/organization must be related to the mission and portfolio priority research interests of AHRQ. The AHRQ mission is to produce evidence to make health care safer, higher quality, more ac­cessible, equitable and affordable, and to work with HHS and other partners to make sure that the evidence is understood and used. Within the mission, AHRQ’s specific priority areas of focus are:

  • Research to improve health care patient safety.
  • Harnessing data and technology to improve health care quality and patient outcomes and to provide a 360-degree view of the patient.
  • Research to increase accessibility and affordability of health care by examining innovative market approaches to care delivery and financing.

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Dec 22, 2020
Wednesday, May 26, 2021 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Stephen I. Katz Early Stage Investigator Research Project Grant (R01 Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required)

January 26, 2021; May 26, 2021; September 28, 2021; January 26, 2022; May 26, 2022; September 27, 2022; January 26, 2023; May 26, 2023; September 26, 2023

Participating NIH ICs of note for HPS: NICHD, NIDCD, NINDS, NIMH, NIA, NIMHD

The Stephen I. Katz Early Stage Investigator Research Project Grant supports an innovative project that represents a change in research direction for an early stage investigator (ESI) and for which no preliminary data exist. Applications submitted to this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) must not include preliminary data. Applications must include a separate attachment describing the change in research direction. Preliminary data are defined as data not yet published. 

An ESI is a Program Director / Principal Investigator (PD/PI) who has completed their terminal research degree or end of post-graduate clinical training, whichever date is later, within the past 10 years and who has not previously competed successfully as PD/PI for a substantial NIH independent research award. 

This Funding Opportunity Announcement is for basic science experimental studies involving humans, referred to in NOT-OD-18-212 as “prospective basic science studies involving human participants.”

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Nov 10, 2020
Wednesday, May 26, 2021 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Stephen I. Katz Early Stage Investigator Research Project Grant (R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

R01 awards are up to $500K per year for five (5) years.

Deadlines are: January 26, 2021; May 26, 2021; September 28, 2021; January 26, 2022; May 26, 2022; September 27, 2022; January 26, 2023; May 26, 2023; September 26, 2023

Participating NIH ICs of note for HPS: NICHD, NIDCD, NINDS, NIMH, NIA, NIMHD

The Stephen I. Katz Early Stage Investigator Research Project Grant supports an innovative project that represents a change in research direction for an early stage investigator (ESI) and for which no preliminary data exist. Applications submitted to this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) must not include preliminary data. Applications must include a separate attachment describing the change in research direction. Preliminary data are defined as data not yet published. 

An ESI is a Program Director / Principal Investigator (PD/PI) who has completed their terminal research degree or end of post-graduate clinical training, whichever date is later, within the past 10 years and who has not previously competed successfully as PD/PI for a substantial NIH independent research award. 

This Funding Opportunity Announcement does not accept applications proposing clinical trials. Need help determining whether you are doing a clinical trial?

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Nov 10, 2020
Tuesday, June 1, 2021 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Notice of Special Interest (NOSI): Aging-Relevant Behavioral and Social Research on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Submit R01, R03, or R21 applications for this initiative using one of the following funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) or any reissues of these announcement through the expiration date of this notice.

Specific deadlines vary. This notice applies to due dates on or after January 26, 2021 through May 8, 2023. Specific deadlines are based on R01, R03, and R21 standard deadlines.

In order to rapidly improve our understanding of the behavioral, social, and economic effects of the pandemic and to enhance our ability to control its spread, NIA is encouraging the submission of applications on these research areas to the FOAs specified in the Application and Submission Information (see FOA for full list).

  • Studies examining how physical distancing requirements and associated social isolation and loneliness impact the health and well-being of midlife and older adult populations, including impacts on psychological well-being, cognitive health, and health behaviors. What strategies implemented by individuals, health systems, institutions, communities, and local governments have been more or less successful at mitigating social isolation and loneliness among older adults?
  • Research considering how mitigation strategies and accompanying financial strain influence health care utilization and health, including individuals with disabilities, multiple chronic conditions, mild cognitive impairment, and/or Alzheimer’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease-related dementias, as well as their care partners and families. What are the interrelated health and economic implications of stay-at-home policies on the health and well-being of midlife and older adults with family care responsibilities, including care for children and older family members?
  • Evaluation of strategies used by health systems to reallocate resources, rapidly train practitioners, communicate preventative practices, and maintain adherence to public health and clinical guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic, with a particular interest in those that serve high-risk groups (e.g., nursing homes) and resulting racial, ethnic, and/or regional disparities in access/care.
  • Studies examining the extent to which existing age, racial, ethnic, gender, socioeconomic, or geographic health disparities are exacerbated by the COVID-19 epidemic, including studies of 1) differential access to and use of health care services, and 2) differential access to information about, attitudes toward, and uptake of preventive measures, testing, and vaccines.
  • Research to address vaccine hesitancy, uptake, and implementation among NIH-designated health disparities populations and other COVID-19 vulnerable populations.

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Feb 10, 2021
Tuesday, June 1, 2021 National Science Foundation Humans, Disasters, and the Built Environment (HDBE)

Award amounts and durations vary.

Full proposals are accepted anytime.

The Humans, Disasters and the Built Environment (HDBE) program supports fundamental, multidisciplinary research on the interactions between humans and the built environment within and among communities exposed to natural, technological and other types of hazards and disasters. The program's context is provided by ongoing and emerging changes in three interwoven elements of a community: its population, its built environment (critical infrastructures, physical and virtual spaces, and buildings and related structures) and the hazards and disasters to which it is exposed. The HDBE program seeks research that integrates these elements and that can contribute to theories that hold over a broad range of scales and conditions.

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Feb 11, 2021
Tuesday, June 1, 2021 National Institutes of Health Notice of Special Interest (NOSI): Research on Co-morbid Substance Use, Substance Use Disorders, and Other Psychiatric Disorders

Submit R03, R21, or R34 applications for this initiative using one of the following funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) or any reissues of these announcement through the expiration date of this notice.

This notice applies to due dates on or after October 05, 2020 and subsequent receipt dates through May 8, 2023.

This NOSI is interested in research project grant applications that would further our understanding of co-morbidity through studies that test interventions (treatment and prevention), across the lifespan. NIDA interest includes, but is not limited to, applications in the following areas:

  • Services research to develop and test strategies to improve system- or provider- capacity for treating and managing co-occurring conditions.
  • Studies of the trajectories of the development of co-morbid substance use, substance use disorders and psychiatric disorders and the ways in which their interactions influence the onset, course and recovery of both; of interest are studies which additionally identify potentially effective points and models of intervention.
  • Intervention research to directly address common mechanisms/dimensions that may underlie both substance use disorders and other psychiatric disorders. Among treatment seeking populations, studies to determine whether or how the receipt of evidence-based treatments for psychiatric disorders impact substance use initiation/and or progression to misuse and disorder.
  • Strategies for augmenting psychiatric care to prevent substance use initiation and/or progression from use to misuse or disorder. This could include research to test whether and how models of care delivery for mental illness (e.g., the collaborative care model, coordinated specialty care for first episode psychosis) could be leveraged for substance use prevention among at-risk individuals.
  • Studies to further understand and prevent suicide and other adverse outcomes (morbidity and mortality) among individuals using illicit substances.
  • Research to promote adherence to pharmacotherapies, such as buprenorphine, methadone, depot naltrexone, Lofexidine, naloxone, or HAART, in substance abuse treatment populations with comorbidities.

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Jun 25, 2020
Tuesday, June 1, 2021 Smith Richardson Foundation Domestic Public Policy Program

Awards are up to $100,000.

Required concept papers can be submitted at any time; only invited full proposals may be submitted.

The Domestic Public Policy Program supports projects that will help the public and policy makers understand and address critical challenges facing the United States. To that end, the Foundation supports research on and evaluation of existing public policies and programs, as well as projects that inject new ideas into public debates. The Foundation has developed a number of grant making portfolios.

  1. A group of grants suppored by the Fondation is focused on the challenges of identifying mechanisms that can inform thinking on fiscal practices at the national, state, and municipal levels.
  2. In terms of human capital development, the Foundation supports work to identify how schools can become more productive by, for example, increasing the quality of the teacher workforce or adopting more effective curricula. Because success in the contemporary economy requires individuals to acquire education and training beyond high school, the Foundation is building a portfolio of projects on post-secondary education.
  3. The Foundation supports work on the criminal justice system that will examine whether costs can be lowered while still protecting public safety.

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Apr 29, 2021
Tuesday, June 1, 2021 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Notice of Special Interest (NOSI) – Research on Rehabilitation Needs Associated with the COVID-19

Submit R01, R03, or R21 applications for this initiative using one of the following funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) or any reissues of these announcement through the expiration date of this notice.

Specific deadlines vary. This notice applies to due dates on or after February 5, 2021 through May 8, 2023. Specific deadlines are based on R01, R03, and R21 standard deadlines.

This NOSI invites research applications on the rehabilitation needs of COVID-19 survivors. At present, the best acute rehabilitation plan for people who have recovered from severe cases of COVID- 19 is unknown. Similarly, the long-term rehabilitation needs and sequalae of people who recover from COVID-19 are not well understood. Furthermore, the interplay of existing physical disabilities and recovery from COVID-19 is also unknown. Research applications are also sought to understand the impact of disruptions to rehabilitation services caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and associated mitigation actions. Applications that measure the impact of delayed treatment for common disabling conditions, such as stroke, are also sought.

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Oct 5, 2020
Tuesday, June 1, 2021 National Institutes of Health Notice of Special Interest to Highlight High Priority Opportunities for Intervention Development Research in Geriatric Mental Health

Submit R01, R21, R33, or R34 applications for this initiative using one of the funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) listed in the Notice of Special Interest (NOSI).

This notice applies to due dates on or after June 5, 2020 and subsequent receipt dates through September 8, 2023.

NIMH is issuing this Notice to highlight its interest in supporting intervention development activities for older adults. Examples of NIMH studies that are encouraged through this Notice include, but are not limited to those that:

  • design and test strategies for increasing the effectiveness of existing interventions administered to older adults with mental disorders (including methods of patient-treatment matching or other approaches to personalizing treatment), particularly in cases where there is evidence of poor or partial response or substandard effectiveness for older adults treated with the intervention(s) in routine clinical practice
  • study the efficacy and effectiveness of internet- and computer-assisted intervention modalities tailored for use by older adults with mental disorders (including computerized games and artificial intelligence informed methods)
  • develop and test interventions to enhance emotion regulation by older adults with mood and anxiety disorders, as informed by research on typical patterns of maturational and aging-related changes in affective functioning
  • develop and test behavioral and psychosocial interventions to improve management of the neuropsychiatric symptoms and syndromes associated with dementia in Alzheimer’s disease and related neurodegenerative disorders
  • develop and test strategies for reducing risk for and preventing suicidal behavior by older adults
  • assess the fidelity and effectiveness of interventions for late-life mental disorders when administered under real-world conditions in typical geriatric residential and care settings (senior centers, assisted living facilities, nursing homes, primary care clinics, adult day care centers, etc.)

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Jun 18, 2020
Tuesday, June 1, 2021 National Institutes of Health Notice of Special Interest (NOSI): Health Services and Economic Research on the Treatment of Drug, Alcohol, and Tobacco Use Disorders

Submit R01, R03, or R21applications for this initiative using one of the following funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) or any reissues of these announcement through the expiration date of this notice.

This notice applies to due dates on or after October 5, 2019 and subsequent receipt dates through September 8, 2022.

The purpose of this Notice is to inform potential applications to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) of special interest in grant applications to conduct rigorous health services and economic research to maximize the availability and delivery of efficient, effective drug, alcohol, and tobacco treatment and recovery support services. Examples of such research include: (1) clinical quality improvement; (2) quality improvement in services organization and management; (3) implementation science; (4) availability, demand, access, and financing; (5) effectiveness; and (6) development or improvement of research methodology, analytic approaches, and measurement instrumentation. This NOSI encourages, but is not limited to, applications in the following areas:

  • Quality improvement studies in services organization and management studies that address organizational contexts and service delivery models, the interaction of providers and programs within and across systems, and at multiple levels (e.g., program, practice network, state), and their collective impact on the quality of service delivery.
  • Studies examining the effects of practice and policy changes on service quality and outcomes, including unintended consequences.
  • Studies developing or applying new methods, analytic techniques or approaches (e.g., modeling), technologies or other innovative tools to improve the rigor and reach of health services research.

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Jun 18, 2020
Tuesday, June 1, 2021 National Institutes of Health Notice of Special Interest (NOSI) in Research on Risk and Prevention of Black Youth Suicide (R01, R34)

Submit R01 or R34 applications for this initiative using one of the following funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) or any reissues of these announcements through the expiration date of this notice.

Specific deadlines vary. This NOSI applies to due dates on or after August 25, 2020 and subsequent receipt dates through July 31, 2022.

The purpose of this Notice of Special Interest (NOSI) is to encourage research focused on Black child and adolescent suicide. Recent data suggest that Black youth, especially those under age 13, appear to be at higher than average risk for suicide and suicide-related behaviors. NIMH encourages research that addresses Institute priorities and is aligned with these recommended areas. Appropriate topics include, but are not limited to studies focused on Epidemiology, Etiology, Trajectories, Intervention and Services Research, Preventive Interventions, Treatment Interventions, or Services Interventions.

NIMHD encourages projects that use approaches encompassing multiple domains of influence (e.g., biological, behavioral, sociocultural, environmental, physical environment, health system) and multiple levels of influence (e.g., individual, interpersonal, family, peer group, community, societal) to understand and address health disparities (see the NIMHD Research Framework, https://www.nimhd.nih.gov/about/overview/research-framework.html, for more information).

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Jun 18, 2020
Tuesday, June 1, 2021 National Institutes of Health Notice of Special Interest (NOSI): NIDCD is Interested in Supporting Research on the Impact of COVID-19 on Mission Specific Sensory and Communication Disorders

Submit R01 or R21 applications for this initiative using one of the following funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) or any reissues of these announcement through the expiration date of this notice.

Specific deadlines vary. This notice applies to standard due dates for R01 and R21 applications on or after October 5, 2020 and subsequent receipt dates through September 8, 2022.

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a recently emerged human disease caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). There is a paucity of data on the impact of SARS-CoV-2 on the sensory and communicative functions within the scientific mission areas of NIDCD. NIDCD invites applications for research on COVID-19 in relation to NIDCD’s scientific programs of hearing, balance, taste, smell, voice, speech and language (HBTSVSL). Given the early stage of COVID-19 research, it is critical that there is a strong premise for research proposals submitted in response to this NOSI. Areas of COVID-19 related research encouraged through this Notice include, but are not limited to studies on or related to:

  • The effects of prolonged oral intubation on laryngeal function and voice production
  • Short-term and long-term effects of COVID-19 on the auditory, vestibular or olfactory systems
  • The prevalence, onset, and resolution of acquired deficits (i.e. HBTSVSL) among patients with COVID-19 across the lifespan and in association with various underlying genetic predispositions and health conditions
  • The impact of stress/isolation on speech, language or fluency recovery/development in children or adults
  • Worsening of communicative function because of physical distancing, sheltering in place, and wearing of protective personal equipment during mitigation of this infectious pandemic
  • Telehealth service delivery to individuals with communication disorders
  • Multidisciplinary collaborative teams including clinicians, basic biologists, geneticists, quantitative scientist, epidemiologists or other researchers to study COVID-19 related human conditions and behaviors, bioethical considerations, health-service delivery, health services in low-resource areas, and health disparities within NIDCD mission areas

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Jun 18, 2020
Tuesday, June 1, 2021 National Institutes of Health Notice of Special Interest (NOSI): Improving Outcomes for Disorders of Human Communication

Submit R01 or R21 applications for this initiative using one of the following funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) or any reissues of these announcement through the expiration date of this notice.

Specific deadlines vary. This notice applies to due dates on or after June 16, 2020 and subsequent receipt dates through January 10 2022.

The purpose of this Notice of Special Interest (NOSI) is to improve health outcomes for individuals with deafness or communication disorders through effectiveness and health services research in the NIDCD mission areas of hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech and language. This NOSI seeks to encourage effectiveness and health services research for improved outcomes in the prevention and treatment of disorders of hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech and language. Applicants are encouraged to create collaborative teams which may include clinical experts not only in the traditional NIDCD mission areas, but also in other medical specialties and health care professions as well as experts in sociology, health services, health outcomes, economics, biostatistics, public health, health care financing and organization, survey research, psychometrics, epidemiology, and evaluation.

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Jun 18, 2020
Tuesday, June 1, 2021 National Institutes of Health Notice of Special Interest (NOSI): Development and Preliminary Testing of Health-related Behavioral Interventions

Specific deadlines vary. This notice applies to due dates on or after June 22, 2020 and subsequent receipt dates through September 26, 2022.

Applicants must select the IC and associated R01, R21,or R21/R33 FOA to use for submission of an application in response to this NOSI. Participating ICs include, but are not limited to,: National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), and National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH).

The Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) and participating ICs are issuing this Notice to highlight interest in the systematic development of novel health-related behavioral interventions that leverage new, emerging or understudied areas in basic behavioral and social sciences research (bBSSR). To achieve more potent and sustained strategies to promote health-related behavior change, there is a need for intentional and methodical translation of foundational behavioral and social science discoveries into new or improved interventions. This includes research that focuses on use-inspired bBSSR, understanding of mechanisms of action underlying initial and sustained behavior change, and systematic development and testing of health-related behavioral interventions and their components.

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Jun 18, 2020
Tuesday, June 1, 2021 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Notice of Special Interest (NOSI) – Research on Rehabilitation Needs Associated with the COVID-19 Pandemic

This notice applies to due dates on or after February 5, 2021 and subsequent receipt dates through May 8, 2023. Specific deadlines vary.

Submit R01, R03, or R21 applications for this initiative using one of the following funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) or any reissues of these announcement through the expiration date of this notice.

The purpose of this Notice of Special Interest is to encourage applications in three areas related to the intersection of COVID-19, the associated mitigation actions, and rehabilitation:

  1. Encourage research to address the rehabilitation needs of survivors of COVID-19
  2. Understand the impact of disruptions to rehabilitation services caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and associated mitigation actions
  3. Understand the social, behavioral, economic, and health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the associated mitigation actions on people with physical disabilities

Research applications addressing these topics are considered responsive; not all topics are expected within the same application. Applications will be directed to the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR) at NICHD.

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Oct 9, 2020
Tuesday, June 1, 2021 National Institutes of Health Notice of Special Interest (NOSI): Mental Health Comorbidities in HIV Prevention and Treatment

Submit R01, R03, R15, R21, R34, F31, K23, or K99/R00 applications for this initiative using one of the listed parent funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) listed in this NOSI.

Specific deadlines vary. Applies to due dates on or after May 7, 2020 and subsequent receipt dates through May 8, 2023.

The National Institute of Mental Health is issuing this Notice to highlight interest in receiving grant applications focused on understanding and addressing the impact of mental health comorbidities, including mental health disorders as well as violence and trauma, on the HIV prevention and treatment continua.

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Jun 26, 2020
Monday, June 7, 2021 National Institutes of Health Long-Term Effects of Disasters on Health Care Systems Serving Health Disparity Populations (R01)

R01 deadlines are 3 times a year: October 5, February 5, and June 5 (cycle III deadline falls on June 7, 2021). Applications will be accepted for each standard deadline during the period of October 5, 2020 through September 08, 2023.

Awards are up to $500,000 (direct costs) annually for up to 5 years.

The overarching goal of this FOA is to invite robust investigative and collaborative research focused on understanding the long-term effects of disasters on health disparity populations and the health care systems that serve them, including the influence of risk factors or vulnerabilities of both the systems and the communities preceding the event(s). This initiative focuses on (i) describing the direct effects of disasters on health care systems, and specifically on the delivery, coordination, safety and quality of health care services, physical and organizational infrastructure, health care workforce and changes in health care needs and disparities of the communities they serve, and (ii) identifying strategies or best practices that health care systems or communities have implemented that promote appropriate system function and delivery of services during and after the disaster, maintenance of optimal continuity of care, and resilience of health care systems and populations for future events.

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Jun 18, 2020
Monday, June 7, 2021 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Notice of Special Interest (NOSI): Research to Address Vaccine Hesitancy, Uptake, and Implementation among Populations that Experience Health Disparities

Awards are R01 projects that are up to $500K direct costs per year for 3-5 years in duration.

Proposals will be accepted for regular R01 deadlines through January 2022; June 7, 2021 & October 5, 2021.

This Notice of Special Interest (NOSI) highlights the need for research strategies and interventions to address vaccine hesitancy, uptake, and implementation among populations who experience health disparities in the US. Research is needed to understand and address misinformation, distrust, and hesitancy regarding vaccines (e.g., SARS-CoV-2, pneumococcal, influenza, hepatitis B, human papilloma virus (HPV), and herpes zoster) among adults in the United States and territories, especially in populations at increased risk for morbidity and mortality due to long-standing systemic health and social inequities and chronic medical conditions. The purpose of this NOSI is to solicit community-engaged research to: 1) evaluate intervention strategies (e.g., expand reach, access) to facilitate vaccination uptake in clinical and community contexts; and 2) address the barriers to increasing reach, access, and uptake of vaccinations among health disparity populations at high risk and likely to experience vaccine hesitancy.

Investigators planning to submit an application in response to this NOSI are strongly encouraged to contact and discuss their proposed research/aims with Program staff listed on this NOSI well in advance of the anticipated submission date to better determine appropriateness and interest of the IC.

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Apr 20, 2021
Tuesday, June 8, 2021 National Institutes of Health Mechanism for Time-Sensitive Drug Abuse Research (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

Awards are up to $275,000 (direct costs) for up to two (2) years.

Upcoming due dates are: February 8, 2021; June 8, 2021; October 8, 2021

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) will support pilot, feasibility or exploratory research in 5 priority areas in substance use epidemiology and health services, including: 1) responses to sudden and severe emerging drug issues (e.g. the ability to look into a large and sudden spike in opioid or synthetic cannabinoid use/overdoses in a particular community); 2) responses to emerging marijuana trends and topics related to the shifting policy landscape; 3) responses to unexpected and time-sensitive prescription drug abuse research opportunities (e.g.,  new state or local efforts); 4) responses to unexpected and time-sensitive medical system issues (e.g. opportunities to understand addiction services in the evolving health care system); and 5) responses to unexpected and time-sensitive criminal or juvenile justice opportunities (e.g. new system and/or structural level changes) that relate to drug abuse and access and provision of health care service.

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Jun 11, 2020
Wednesday, June 16, 2021 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) AHRQ/PCORI Learning Health System Small Grant Pilot Program (R03)

Awards are up to $100,000 for one (1) year.

Deadlines are June 16, 2021; October 16, 2021; February 16, 2022; and June 16, 2022.

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), in partnership with the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), invites applications for funding to support innovative patient-centered outcomes research small pilot projects in Learning Health Systems (LHS) that evaluate the outcomes of embedded research and evaluate the processes by which embedded research can enhance impact, stakeholder engagement, and other health system-identified outcomes of interest.

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Mar 15, 2021
Wednesday, June 16, 2021 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Notice of Special Interest: Small Grants for Secondary Analyses of Existing Data Sets and Stored Biospecimens

R03 awards are up to $50,000 per year for two (2) years.

Deadlines are February 16, June 16, and October 16 each year through October 2023. Apply under parent R03 announcement PA-20-200.

This initiative encourages secondary analysis on scientific topics within the scientific scope of NICHD overall and the research priorities of the NICHD Extramural Scientific Branches and NCMRR. Research involving linking existing data to complementary data sources such as administrative records, vital statistics, or spatial data is encouraged. The types of data available for analysis by researchers outside the original research team include data from clinical trials, panel studies and other longitudinal research, cross-sectional studies, observational studies, multi-method studies, and other types of basic biomedical, clinical, behavioral, demographic, and epidemiological research. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

- Physiological factors affecting change (e.g., endocrine, musculoskeletal health, reproductive health) at different points in the life span, including factors contributing to health status across the life course

- Differences in risk factors related to health and developmental outcomes at different ages, at different stages of disease progression, and in the presence or absence of co-existing conditions

- Methodological development using one or more data sets to develop and test new analytic approaches within the scientific mission of NICHD and within the scientific scope of NICHD or NCMRR priorities

- Development of common data elements (CDEs) or ontologies across existing data resources

Examples of NICHD datasets and research resources include: the NICHD Data and Specimen Hub (DASH), Data Sharing for Demographic Research (DSDR), the Child Language Development Exchange (CHILDES), the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI), and Xenbase.

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Dec 3, 2020
Wednesday, June 16, 2021 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Archiving and Documenting Child Health and Human Development Data Sets (R03 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

R03 awards are up to $50,000 a year for two (2) years.

Deadlines are February 16, June 16, and October 16 each year through 2023.

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to promote and facilitate the archiving and documentation of existing data sets within the scientific mission of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) in order to enable secondary analysis of these data by the scientific community. The highest priority is to archive data collected with NICHD support. This includes collecting data and biological samples on a wide array of relevant inputs including measures related to psychosocial and sociodemographic factors, cognition, genetics and biomarkers, pregnancy, reproductive health, behavioral medicine, and well-being over the life course. Examples of activities encouraged by this FOA include, but are not limited to:

Archiving and developing population health, socio-behavioral, and/or demographic data sets that conform to international standards for data documentation, including adequate descriptions of metadata and searchable instruments for public use

Harmonizing data and measures across multiple data sets

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Dec 3, 2020
Wednesday, June 16, 2021 National Institutes of Health Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health

Awards are up to $275,000 (direct costs) for up to two (2) years.

R21 proposals are due three times a year: February 16June 16, and October 16 through February 16, 2022.

This FOA invites research grant applications that will identify, develop, test, evaluate, and/or refine strategies to disseminate and implement evidence-based practices (e.g. behavioral interventions; prevention, early detection, diagnostic, treatment and disease management interventions; quality improvement programs) into public health, clinical practice, and community (e.g., workplace, school, place of worship) settings. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support innovative approaches to identifying, understanding, and developing strategies for overcoming barriers to the adoption, adaptation, integration, scale-up and sustainability of evidence-based interventions, tools, policies, and guidelines. Conversely, there is a benefit in understanding circumstances that create a need to stop or reduce (“de-implement”) the use of interventions that are ineffective, unproven, low-value, or harmful. In addition, studies to advance dissemination and implementation research methods and measures are encouraged.

This FOA funds  "dissemination research" and "implementation research".

Dissemination research is defined as the scientific study of targeted distribution of information and intervention materials to a specific public health or clinical practice audience. The intent is to understand how best to communicate and integrate knowledge and the associated evidence-based interventions.

Implementation research is defined as the scientific study of the use of strategies to adopt and integrate evidence-based health interventions into clinical and community settings to improve individual outcomes and benefit population health.

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Jul 23, 2020
Thursday, June 24, 2021 National Institutes of Health (NIH) NIDCD Early Career Research (ECR) Award (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

Awards are up to $375,000 for up to three (3) years.

Deadlines June 24, 2021; October 28, 2021; February 24, 2022; June 23, 2022; October 27, 2022; February 23, 2023; June 29, 2023; October 26, 2023.

The NIDCD Early Career Research (ECR) Award is different from other NIH R21 programs. It is restricted to clinical and basic scientists who are transitioning to, or are already in the early stages of, their independent research career. The research should be focused on one or more of the areas within the biomedical and behavioral scientific mission of the NIDCD, specifically: hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech, or language. The expected outcome from projects funded under this mechanism is the acquisition of necessary preliminary data for a subsequent research project grant (R01) application.

The PD/PI must be a U.S. citizen, permanent resident or valid U.S. visa holder. The PD/PI must be no more than 7 years beyond the date that the first professional, advanced professional, or terminal academic degree was awarded, whichever is most recent.

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Mar 4, 2021
Monday, June 28, 2021 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Research in Transforming Health and Health Care Systems

Awards are $150,000 to $350,000 per project to for studies of 12 to 36 months in duration.

Phase 1 brief proposals due June 28t, 2021 and invited full proposals due November 1, 2021.

Special topic of the Call for Proposals: Understanding the Impact of Medicaid Policy Changes in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic and Structural Racism.

The purpose of this 2021 RTHS call for proposals is to fund research studies that evaluate or predict how enrollees are effected by Medicaid policy changes enacted in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Given the disproportionate impact of the pandemic on communities of color, we are requesting studies that examine the impact of Medicaid policies on communities of color and/or explore how current or proposed policies may alleviate or exacerbate racial inequity and structural racism in the context of Medicaid. The goal of this funding opportunity is to generate rigorous evidence on the effects of recent Medicaid policy changes on enrollees, states, and others, and to inform and advance equitable policies and racial equity in Medicaid.

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Apr 21, 2021
Monday, June 28, 2021 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Research in Transforming Health and Health Care Systems

Awards are $150,000- $300,000 for projects that are 12 to 36 months in duration.

Required brief proposals due June 28th; invited full proposals due November 1st.

The purpose of the 2021 RTHS call for proposals (CFP) is to fund research studies that evaluate or predict the effects of Medicaid policy changes enacted in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Given the disproportionate impact of the pandemic on communities of color, we are requesting studies that examine the impact of Medicaidpolicies on communities of color and/or explore how current or proposed policies may alleviate or exacerbate racial inequity and structural racism in the context of Medicaid. The goal of this funding opportunity is to generate rigorous evidence on the impact of recent Medicaid policy changes on enrollees, states, and others, and to inform and advance equitable policies and racial equity in Medicaid. Here are a few examples of types of Medicaid policies and questions of interest (see full call for proposals to see all examples):

  • What are the impacts of various Medicaid and CHIP provisions in the American Rescue Plan Act? For example, in states that opt to extend postpartum coverage for birthing people, what is the impact on health outcomes, especially among birthing people of color?
  • What are the impacts of data collection and data equity efforts in Medicaid (e.g., disaggregating data by race and ethnicity) on racial equity?
  • In relation to any Medicaid policy examined: Will the policy increase access and opportunities for communities of color? Are there differences in policy impacts by race/ethnicity? How do those differences break out by disability status or gender identity? Are there unintended consequences associated with these policies that need to be addressed should policies be extended beyond the pandemic? Are Medicaid policies enacted during the pandemic addressing or exacerbating racial inequities in access, care, and outcomes?

RWJF will prioritize studies that are led by or meaningfully involve Medicaid enrollees and community organizations, or other stakeholders that are directly impacted by the policy being studied. See the full call for proposals for details about what constitues meaningful involvement.

Optional webinar is May 3, 2021. Registration is required through this link.

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Apr 29, 2021
Thursday, July 1, 2021 Georgia State University (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation) Rapid Cycle Research and Evaluation Grants for Aligning Systems for Health: Health Care + Public Health + Social Services

Awards are up to $75,000 for projects that can be achieved in 9 months.

 

The Aligning Systems for Health program seeks to strengthen the evidence base around conditions that foster cross‐sector alignment and translates these insights for communities, researchers, and decision makers to support on‐the‐ground efforts aimed at greater system alignment. The Aligning Systems for Health program is ran by the Georgia Health Policy Center and is funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. GHPC is supporting a rolling submission process for a third call for rapid‐cycle research and evaluation projects that examine cross‐sector alignment efforts already underway. In this round, GHPC is particularly interested in research projects that explore how cross‐sector alignment and its constructs might be measured, including examination of the following research questions:

(Emphasis will be placed on rapid translation of findings to the field. Comparative analyses are encouraged.)

  • How are collaboratives and partner organizations engaging community members in the course of measuring collaborative processes and outcomes?
  • To what degree does the inclusion of community voices in process and outcome measurement prepare systems to be more accountable for people’s and communities’ goals and needs?
  • How are cross‐sector alignment processes and outcomes measured in fast‐changing times, when technical details are often pushed aside? What affects whether or not cross‐sector alignment processes and outcomes are measured at all?
  • How are collaboratives deciding on process and outcome measures and measurement strategies? How are these process and outcome measures and measurement strategies linked to other data and data systems being used by their organizations?
  • How are multisite collaboratives encouraging the uptake of process and outcome measurement tools across sites?
  • What has been learned from the use of standardized or publicly available process and outcome measures, and how have such measures been used (or how could they be used) to make comparative assessments either within collaboratives or individual sites or across sites?
  • What has been learned from the creation and use of custom process and outcome measures developed within collaboratives or specific sites? How might similar measurement approaches be useful for other collaboratives?
  • How have efforts to center equity within collaboratives or partner organizations been measured? What are the results, and why?

Georgia Health Policy Center webpage on the Aligning Systems for Health: Health Care + Public Health + Social Services

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Apr 29, 2021
Thursday, July 1, 2021 U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA) FY 2021-2023 Economic Development Research and Evaluation (R&E) and National Technical Assistance (NTA) programs, jointly known as RNTA

Awards range between $200,000 and $500,000

There are no submission deadlines under this NOFO. Applications will be accepted on an ongoing basis until the termination of this NOFO or publication of a superseding RNTA NOFO.

Under this NOFO, EDA solicits applications for investments that support research, evaluation, and national technical assistance projects under EDA’s Research and Evaluation (R&E) and National Technical Assistance (NTA) programs.

Through the R&E program, EDA supports the development of tools, recommendations, and resources that shape Federal economic development policies and inform economic development decision-making. R&E program investments provide critical, cutting-edge research and best practices to regional, state, and local practitioners in the economic development field, thereby enhancing understanding and implementation of economic development concepts throughout the country.

EDA’s NTA program supports a small number of projects that provide technical assistance at a national scope. These projects support best practices among communities trying to solve problems related to economic development goals. By working in conjunction with its national technical assistance partners, EDA helps States, local governments, and community-based organizations to achieve their highest economic potential. The NTA program supports activities that are beneficial to the economic development community nationwide and includes, but is not limited to, outreach, training, and information dissemination. It can also provide assistance with implementation of economic development best practices and proven techniques.

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Apr 5, 2021
Monday, July 12, 2021 National Science Foundation and Trans-Atlantic Platform for Social Sciences and Humanities (T-AP) Dear Colleague Letter: NSF/SBE Participating in the Trans-Atlantic Platform Recovery, Renewal and Resilience in a Post-Pandemic World Call for Proposals

Awards are up to $200,000 from the National Science Foundation for U.S. team members for projects that are between 24 and 36 months in duration.

LOI (required) due June 14, 2021; full proposals due July 12, 2021.

The purpose of this Dear Colleague Letter is to announce that the National Science Foundation's Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (NSF/SBE) is participating in the Trans-Atlantic Platform Call for Proposals, Recovery, Renewal, and Resilience in a Post-Pandemic World (T-AP RRR). T-AP RRR is a grant competition that will support international collaborative research projects that address key gaps in our understanding of the complex and dynamic societal effects of COVID-19.

T-AP RRR will support international collaborative research projects that advance our understanding of the complex and dynamic societal effects of COVID-19. This understanding, in turn, should advance knowledge of how to mitigate the negative societal effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and support recovery and renewal in a post-pandemic world. Specifically, T-AP RRR invites research proposals that address one or more of the following challenges: reducing inequalities and vulnerabilities; building a more resilient, inclusive, and sustainable society; fostering democratic governance and participation; advancing responsible and inclusive digital innovation; and/or ensuring effective and accurate communication and media.

The full T-AP RRR Call for Proposals, details about eligibility, and instructions for preparing and submitting proposals are available on the T-AP RR website. International team proposals must first be submitted via the SAGe system hosted by the São Paulo Research Foundation. The link to the SAGe system can be found on the T-AP RRR website.

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Apr 20, 2021
Tuesday, July 13, 2021 National Science Foundation Racial Equity in STEM Education (EHR Racial Equity)

Award amounts and durations vary.

Full proposal deadlines vary and are: July 13, 2021; October 12, 2021 (2nd Tuesday in October, Annually Thereafter); and March 22, 2022 (4th Tuesday in March, Annually Thereafter)

Proposals should advance racial equity in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and workforce development through research (both fundamental and applied) and practice.  Core to this funding opportunity is that proposals are led by, or developed and led in authentic partnership with, individuals and communities most impacted by the inequities caused by systemic racism.

Proposals should articulate a rigorous plan to generate knowledge through research (both fundamental and applied) and practice, such as, but not limited to: 

  • building theory;  

  • developing methods; 

  • testing approaches and interventions;  

  • assessing the potential, efficacy, effectiveness, and scalability of approaches and interventions;  

  • establishingcultivating and assessing authentic partnerships; 

  • changing institutional, organizational, and structural practices and policies; and/or  

  • focusing on affective, behavioral, cultural, social components, and implications. 

Contexts may include, but are not limited to: preK-12, two- and four-year undergraduate, and graduate institutions; municipal organizations; STEM workplaces; and informal STEM contexts, such as museums, community organizations, and media. 

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Apr 12, 2021
Wednesday, July 14, 2021 National Science Foundation Science of Learning and Augmented Intelligence (SL)

Award amounts and duration vary.

Deadlines are January 20, 2021 and July 14, 2021 and then the third Tuesday in January and July annually thereafter.

The program supports research addressing learning in individuals and in groups, across a wide range of domains at one or more levels of analysis including: molecular/cellular mechanisms; brain systems; cognitive, affective, and behavioral processes; and social/cultural influences. There is special interest in collaborative and collective models of learning and/or intelligence that are supported by the unprecedented speed and scale of technological connectivity. This includes emphasis on how people and technology working together in new ways and at scale can achieve more than either can attain alone. The program also seeks explanations for how the emergent intelligence of groups, organizations, and networks intersects with processes of learning, behavior and cognition in individuals. Examples of general research questions within scope of Science of Learning and Augmented Intelligence (SL) include:

  • How can we integrate research findings and insights across levels of analysis, relating understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of learning in the neurons to circuit and systems-level computations of learning in the brain, to cognitive, affective, social, and behavioral processes of learning?
  • What is the relationship between assembly of new networks (development) and learning new knowledge in a maturing/mature brain?

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Dec 22, 2020
Thursday, July 15, 2021 National Science Foundation Developmental Sciences (DS)

Award amounts and durations vary.

Proposals are due July 15, 2021 and January 17, 2022 and July 15th and January 15th annually thereafter.

DS supports basic research that increases our understanding of cognitive, linguistic, social, cultural, and biological processes related to human development across the lifespan. Research supported by this program will add to our knowledge of the underlying developmental processes that support social, cognitive, and behavioral functioning, thereby illuminating ways for individuals to live productive lives as members of society.

DS supports research that addresses developmental processes within the domains of cognitive, social, emotional, and motor development across the lifespan by working with any appropriate populations for the topics of interest including infants, children, adolescents, adults, and non-human animals. The program also supports research investigating factors that affect developmental change including family, peers, school, community, culture, media, physical, genetic, and epigenetic influences. Additional priorities include research that: incorporates multidisciplinary, multi-method, microgenetic, and longitudinal approaches; develops new methods, models, and theories for studying development; includes participants from a range of ethnicities, socioeconomic backgrounds, and cultures; and integrates different processes (e.g., memory, emotion, perception, cognition), levels of analysis (e.g., behavioral, social, neural), and time scales. 

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Feb 10, 2021
Sunday, August 1, 2021 National Science Foundation Law & Science (LS)

Standard Research Grant awards have no stated dollar amount limit or maximum project duration.

Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant (DDRIG) awards are up to $20,000 for one (1) year.

Application due dates are twice a year on January 15th and August 1st. Upcoming due dates: January 15, 2021; August 1, 2021; January 15, 2022; August 1, 2022.

Successful proposals describe research that advances scientific theory and understanding of the connections between human behavior and law, legal institutions, or legal processes; or the interactions of law and basic sciences, including biology, computer and information sciences, STEM education, engineering, geosciences, and math and physical sciences. Fields of study include many disciplines, and often address problems including, through not limited to: Crime, Violence, and Policing; Cyberspace; Economic Issues; Environmental Science; Evidentiary Issues; Forensic Science; Governance and Courts; Human Rights and Comparative Law; Information Technology; Legal and Ethical issues related to Science; Legal Decision Making; Legal Mobilization and Conceptions of Justice; Litigation and the Legal Procession; Punishment and Corrections; Use of Science in the Legal Processes.

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Sep 16, 2020
Monday, August 2, 2021 National Science Foundation Perception, Action & Cognition (PAC)

Award amounts and durations vary.

Proposals for research are accepted July 15, 2021 - August 2, 2021 and January 15, 2022 - February 1, 2022 and then between July 15 - August 15 or  January 15 - February 1 annually thereafter.

The PAC program funds theoretically motivated research on a wide-range of topic areas related to typical human behavior with particular focus on perceptual, motor, and cognitive processes and their interactions. Central research topics for consideration by the program include (but are not limited to) vision, audition, haptics, attention, memory, written and spoken language, spatial cognition, motor control, categorization, reasoning, and concept formation. Of particular interest are emerging areas, such as the interaction of sleep or emotion with cognitive or perceptual processes, epigenetics of cognition, computational models of cognition, and cross-modal and multimodal processing. The program welcomes a wide range of perspectives, such as individual differences, symbolic and neural-inspired computation, ecological approaches, genetics and epigenetics, nonlinear dynamics and complex systems, and a variety of methodologies spanning the range of experimentation and modeling.  The PAC program is open to co-review of proposals submitted to other programs both within the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Directorate and across other directorates.  

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Feb 10, 2021
Thursday, August 5, 2021 Department of Defense - Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDRMP) Idea Development Award- Austism Research Program (ARP)

Awards are up to $550,000 total for a duration of up to three (3) years.

LOI (required) due May 3, 2021.

The FY21 ARP Idea Development Award seeks applications from all areas of research. The ARP encourages applications that address the critical needs of the ASD community in one or more of the following areas (see full announcement for all areas):

  • Improve diagnosis across the life span
  • Factors promoting success in key transitions to independence for individuals living with ASD
  • Development of healthcare provider-focused training or tools to improve healthcare delivery for individuals with ASD across the life span and the continuum of care (i.e., primary care, urgent/emergent care, and disaster relief)
  • Cultural and socioeconomic factors in treatment efficacy, delivery, and access to services Mechanisms underlying sex differences (i.e., prevalence, biological mechanisms, phenotypic expression, core and comorbid syndrome expression and outcomes, developmental trajectories, diagnosis, and treatment response)
  • Mechanisms underlying conditions co-occurring with ASD (e.g., sleep disturbances, gastrointestinal issues, inflammation, aggression, depression, anxiety, attention deficit, and seizures)
  • Factors impacting quality of life during geographic relocation, such as military permanent change of station
  • Long-term treatment outcomes from previous clinical trials for ASD core symptoms or to alleviate co-occurring conditions
  • Create tools and strategies to increase the speed with which evidence-based practices are deployed in community-based setting

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Mar 24, 2021
Thursday, August 5, 2021 Department of Defense - Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDRMP) Career Development Award - Autism Research Program

Awards are up to $500,000 total for a duration of up to three (3) years.

LOI (required) due May 3, 2021.

This award enables early-career investigators to compete for funding separately from investigators with established programs of ASD research. Key elements of this award are as follows:

  • Impact: The proposed research is expected to make an important and original contribution to advancing the understanding of ASD and ultimately lead to improved outcomes for individuals with ASD and their families/caregivers. The project’s impact on both ASD research and ASD care should be clearly articulated. A statistical plan is an important aspect of the FY21 ARP Career Development Award to demonstrate the significance of any research outcomes or findings.
  • Preliminary data: Although the proposed research must have direct relevance to ASD, the required preliminary data, which may include unpublished results from the laboratory of the PI(s), research team, or collaborators named on the application, may be from outside the ASD research field. Research should also be based on a sound scientific rationale that is established through logical reasoning and critical review and analysis of the literature.
  • Personnel: The FY21 ARP seeks applications from investigators in the early stages of their ASD career. The FY21 ARP Career Development Award is designed to support the continued development of promising independent investigators that are early in their faculty appointments or the transition of established investigators from other research fields into a career in the field of ASD research.Applicants are strongly encouraged to strengthen their applications through collaboration with investigators experienced in ASD research and/or possessing other relevant expertise as demonstrated by a record of funding and publication

Applications are strongly encouraged to address one of the FY21 ARP Career Development Award Areas of Interest. See the full announcement for the list of ARP areas of interest.

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Mar 24, 2021
Tuesday, August 10, 2021 National Science Foundation Coastlines and People (CoPe)

Focused Hub awards are up to $1M per year for three (3) to five (5) years.

Large Hub awards are between $2M and $4M per year for up to five (5) years.

LOI (required) due for Focused Hubs August 10th each year and for Large Hubs September 28th each year.

Investigating the complex interactions between coastal processes, human dynamics, and the built environment requires a focused investment in novel,multidisciplinary science that engages a diverse group of local stakeholders. The goal of this program is to support Coastal Research Hubs, structuredusing a convergent science approach, at the nexus of coastal sustainability, human dimensions, and coastal processes to transform understanding ofinteractions among natural, human-built, and social systems in populated coastal environments. Research Hubs will address issues operating at multiplescales and link science, stakeholder engagement, and education into developing pathways to sustainability in changing coastal environments.

Successful research framework responsive to this solicitation brings together researchers from multiple disciplines, cutting across naturaland/or engineering and/or social and behavioral sciences, to study the dynamic Earth Systems processes and vulnerabilities across varying spatial andtemporal scales. The complex interface between coastal processes/hazards and people requires strong partnerships between the research team andrelevant stakeholders. Therefore, critical sectors of the global coastal economy, e.g., tourism, construction, fisheries, and national security, must beproactively engaged in the development of novel research approaches to advance coastal zone science that inform sound management and conservationefforts for long-term resiliency. Through these partnerships, coastal vulnerabilities can be addressed through research that informs a variety of practicalactions including planning and adaptation promoting resilience; active mitigation of impacts prior to, and after, events; and by accounting for predictableslowly occurring processes at longer temporal and spatial scales.

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Feb 10, 2021
Monday, August 16, 2021 National Science Foundation Accountable Institutions and Behavior (AIB)

Award amounts and duration vary.

Deadlines are August 16th and January 15th each year.

The Accountable Institutions and Behavior (AIB) Program supports basic scientific research that advances knowledge and understanding of issues broadly related to attitudes, behavior, and institutions connected to public policy and the provision of public services. Research proposals are expected to be theoretically motivated, conceptually precise, methodologically rigorous, and empirically oriented. Substantive areas include (but are not limited to) the study of individual and group decision-making, political institutions (appointed or elected), attitude and preference formation and expression, electoral processes and voting, public administration, and public policy. This work can focus on a single case or can be done in a comparative context, either over time or cross-sectionally. The Program does not fund applied research. 

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Feb 10, 2021
Monday, August 16, 2021 National Science Foundation Security and Preparedness (SAP)

Award amounts and duration vary.

Proposals are due August 16, 2021 and January 22, 2022 and then each August 15th and January 17th annually thereafter.

The Security and Preparedness (SAP) Program supports basic scientific research that advances knowledge and understanding of issues broadly related to global and national security. Research proposals are evaluated on the criteria of intellectual merit and broader impacts; the proposed projects are expected to be theoretically motivated, conceptually precise, methodologically rigorous, and empirically oriented. Substantive areas include (but are not limited to) international relations, global and national security, human security, political violence, state stability, conflict processes, regime transition, international and comparative political economy, and peace science.

 

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Feb 10, 2021
Wednesday, August 18, 2021 National Science Foundation Decision, Risk and Management Sciences (DRMS) CONTACTS

Award amount and duration vary.

Deadlines are January 18, 2021 and August 18, 2021 and the January 17th and August 18th annually thereafter.

 

The Decision, Risk and Management Sciences program supports scientific research directed at increasing the understanding and effectiveness of decision making by individuals, groups, organizations, and society. The DRMS program funds research in the areas of judgment and decision making; decision analysis and decision aids; risk analysis, perception, and communication; societal and public policy decision making; management science and organizational design.

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Dec 22, 2020
Tuesday, August 24, 2021 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Understanding and Addressing the Impact of Structural Racism and Discrimination on Minority Health and Health Disparities (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

Awards are for R01 projects that are generally $300,0000-$500,000 direct costs each year for durations of 3- 5 years. See participating IC information in the FOA for specific and varying award funding details.

LOI (strongly encourages) is due July 20, 2021; full proposals are due August 24, 2021. Invitation to submit a full proposal from a submitted LOI is not necessary.

This initiative will support observational or intervention research to understand and address the impact of SRD on minority health and health disparities. Projects must address SRD in one or more NIH-designated populations with health disparities in the US and should address documented disparities in health outcomes. Applications are expected to provide a justification for why the specific types of SRD included constitute SRD, such as how the racism or discrimination is structural rather than reflecting individual-level behavior and how the SRD results in differential treatment or outcomes for less advantaged individuals, groups or populations. Applications are also expected to provide a conceptual model identifying hypothesized pathways between the SRD and health outcomes. Potential health outcomes may reflect health status; health condition-specific or all-cause disability, quality of life, mortality and morbidity; biological measures that reflect cumulative exposures to and effects of SRD; health behaviors; or access to, utilization of, or quality of health care. It is also expected that projects will collect data on SRD beyond individual self-reported perceptions and experiences to include data at organizational, community or societal levels.

Projects are expected to involve collaborations with relevant organizations or groups or stakeholders, such as academic institutions, health service providers and systems, state and local public health agencies or other governmental agencies such as housing and transportation, criminal justice systems, school systems, patient or consumer advocacy groups, community-based organizations, and faith-based organizations. Multidisciplinary research teams, including researchers from areas outside of the health sciences, such as economics, education, history, criminology, law, and political science, are encouraged.

Observational Studies: Projects may (1) examine the impact of SRD on health, and/or (2) evaluate the impact that existing efforts to address SRD (e.g., laws, policies, programs, organizational practices and procedures) have on the health of individuals, families, and communities. Projects may involve collection of primary data/and or analysis of existing data and may involve quantitative or mixed methods approaches. Projects must be exclusively domestic, including U.S. territories. Projects using longitudinal designs or multiple sites are strongly encouraged, as are projects examining resilience in the face of exposure to SRD.

Intervention Studies: Projects may focus on health promotion, treatment, and/or prevention. Interventions may focus primarily on addressing SRD to improve health outcomes, or SRD may be included as one of several determinants of health addressed to improve health outcomes. For both types of intervention approaches, interventions must directly address the cause or source of SRD, not just help individuals or populations to cope with SRD. To this end, it is expected that investigators will collaborate with leadership from organizations, agencies, or programs where the SRD is originating from or being sustained (e.g., a project addressing SRD in the workplace should involve organizational leaders, human resource managers, or other relevant personnel involved in establishing, maintaining, or enforcing workplace policies and practices rather than only involving employees within a workplace). It is also expected that interventions will involve other relevant personnel or individuals within the setting (e.g., teachers, clinicians, co-workers, bystanders) as appropriate to enact changes to SRD, not just those who are directly experiencing SRD.

A pre-application technical assistance webinar is scheduled for May 26, 2021: See Notice NOT-MD-21-018.

Need help determining whether you are doing a clinical trial?

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Apr 29, 2021
Wednesday, August 25, 2021 National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)

REU Site awards are around $135,000 per year for between three (3) and five (5) years.

Proposals due for REU Site program August 25, 2021 and the fourth August

The Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program supports active research participation by undergraduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the National Science Foundation. REU projects involve students in meaningful ways in ongoing research programs or in research projects specifically designed for1 the REU program. This solicitation features two mechanisms for support of student research: (1) REU Sites arebased on independent proposals to initiate and conduct projects that engage a number of students in research. REUSites may be based in a single discipline or academic department or may offer interdisciplinary or multi-department research opportunities with a coherent intellectual theme. Proposals with an international dimension are welcome. (2) REU Supplements may be included as a component of proposals for new or renewal NSF grants or cooperative agreements or may be requested for ongoing NSF-funded research projects.

The REU experience is a research training experience is paid via a stipend, not employment (work) paid with a salary or wage. In this case, the student's training consists of closely mentored independent research.

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Feb 11, 2021
Thursday, August 26, 2021 National Science Foundation Methodology, Measurement, and Statistics (MMS)

Deadlines are the last Thursday in August and last Thursday in January each year. Upcoming due dates: January 28, 2021; August 26, 2021; January 27, 2022.

The Methodology, Measurement, and Statistics (MMS) Program is an interdisciplinary program in the Directorate forSocial, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences that supports the development of innovative analytical and statistical methods and models for those sciences. MMS seeks proposals that are methodologically innovative, grounded intheory, and have potential utility for multiple fields within the social, behavioral, and economic sciences. As part of itslarger portfolio, the MMS Program partners with a consortium of federal statistical agencies to support researchproposals that further the production and use of official statistics.

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Jul 30, 2020
Friday, September 3, 2021 National Science Foundation Science of Organizations (SoO)

Award amounts and durations vary.

Proposals due September 3, 2021 and February 2, 2022 and September 3rd and February 2nd annually thereafter.

SoO funds research that advances our fundamental understanding of how organizations develop, form and operate. Successful SoO research proposals use scientific methods to develop and refine theories, to empirically test theories and frameworks, and to develop new measures and methods. Funded research is aimed at yielding generalizable insights that are of value to the business practitioner, policy-maker and research communities. SoO welcomes any and all rigorous, scientific approaches that illuminate aspects of organizations as systems of coordination, management and governance.

In considering whether a particular project might be a candidate for consideration by SoO, please note:

  • Intellectual perspectives may involve (but are not limited to) organizational theory, behavior, sociology or economics, business policy and strategy, communication sciences, entrepreneurship, human resource management, information sciences, managerial and organizational cognition, operations management, public administration, social or industrial psychology, and technology and innovation management.
  • Phenomena studied may include (but are not limited to) structures, routines, effectiveness, competitiveness, innovation, dynamics, change and evolution.
  • Levels of analysis may include (but are not limited to) organizational, cross-organizational collaborations or relationships, and institutional and can address individuals, groups or teams.
  • Research methods may be qualitative and quantitative and may include (but are not limited to) archival analyses, surveys, simulation studies, experiments, comparative case studies, and network analyses.

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Feb 11, 2021
Friday, October 1, 2021 Whitehall Foundation Research Grants/ Grants in Aid for Biological Research

Research Grant awards are between $30,000 and $75,000 each year for up to three (3) years.

Grants in Aid awards are up to $30,000 for one (1) year.

LOIs are due January 15th, April 15th, and October 1st each year.

The Whitehall Foundation, through its program of grants and grants-in-aid, assists scholarly research in the life sciences. It is the Foundation's policy to assist those dynamic areas of basic biological research that are not heavily supported by Federal Agencies or other foundations with specialized missions. The Foundation emphasizes the support of young scientists at the beginning of their careers and productive senior scientists who wish to move into new fields of interest.

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Feb 9, 2021
Monday, October 4, 2021 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Short Courses on Interdisciplinary Behavioral and Social Sciences Research on Aging (R25 - Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

Awards are up to $139,000 in direct costs per year for up to five (5) years.

The goal of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support short courses geared towards advancing selected priority topic areas identified by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) in order to advance research in the behavioral and social sciences. This FOA targets the following three priority research areas: 1) genomics for social scientists; 2) interdisciplinary social science research in aging; and 3) reproducibility in the social and behavioral sciences. 

  • Genomics for Social Scientists. The goal for this course is to lower the barrier of entry of social scientists into aging research using genetic and epigenetic data and to provide hands-on experiences for researchers working at the intersection of genetics and social science research. For the purposes of course instruction, use of longitudinal data that is relevant to aging research, that has sufficient power to study disadvantaged groups, and that can support studies of cellular and molecular mechanisms of aging, is strongly encouraged. Courses are also encouraged that incorporate both lecture and lab-based content. For maximum impact, gearing this course to early career scholars with experience conducting statistical examinations of behavioral traits and social processes, but who lack genetic or biological training, is encouraged.
  • Interdisciplinary Social Science Research in Aging. The goal for this course is to attract new and/or junior researchers into interdisciplinary, life course social and behavioral science research on aging; to increase cross-fertilization among different social and behavioral science disciplines (e.g., demography, sociology, epidemiology, economics, psychology, and behavioral medicine) and between these and the biomedical disciplines; and to expose participants to important issues facing the aging population and the major research approaches and data resources for addressing them. Applicants are encouraged to read the report of the 2019 National Advisory Council on Aging's Review of the NIA Division of Behavioral and Social Research which provides recommendations for potential focus areas.
  • Reproducibility in the Social and Behavioral Sciences. The social and behavioral sciences have made progress in establishing tools, best practices, and training curricula to accelerate reproducibility and to target the gap between current research training and the standards of rigor and transparency now required by funders, journals, and research institutions. Less attention has been paid to behavioral and social research on aging, including experimental and interventional research, observational research, longitudinal studies, qualitative research, and secondary analysis. Courses that expand upon existing resources and target them to behavioral and social science aging researchers are therefore encouraged. Courses might address issues of study design, sample construction, measurement reliability, reproducibility, replication, and causal inference, among others.

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Apr 22, 2021
Monday, November 1, 2021 National Science Foundation SBE Postdoctoral Research Fellowships (SPRF)

Annual Fellowship amount of $69,000

Due November 1, 2020 (and annually on Nov. 1 thereafter)

The National Science Foundation offers Postdoctoral Research Fellowships to provide opportunities for recent doctoral graduates to obtain additional training, to gain research experience under the sponsorship of established social scientists, and to broaden their scientific horizons beyond their undergraduate and graduate training.

Areas of Research: The Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE) supports research in a broad range ofdisciplines and in interdisciplinary areas through its Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences (BCS) Division, Social and Economic Sciences (SES) Division, and SBE Office of Multidisciplinary Activities (SMA).

Note: Proposals are submitted directly bythe Fellowship candidate to NSF, not by the Fellowship candidate's current or proposed organizational Sponsored Projects Office (SPO).

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Oct 1, 2020
Wednesday, November 10, 2021 National Science Foundation Smart Health and Biomedical Research in the Era of Artificial Intelligence and Advanced Data Science (SCH)

Awards amounts will vary but are generally around $1M.

Due dates are Februrary 16, 2021; November 10, 2021; and November 10, 2022.

This program funds work that makes fundamental contributions to two or more discipline such as computer or information sciences, engineering, mathematical sciences, social, behavioral, biomedical, cognitive or economic sciences to improve fundamental understanding of biomedical and health related processes and address a key health problem. Successful proposals should address challenges in the areas of:

  • Information Infrastructure
  • Transformative Data Science
  • Novel multimodal sensor system hardware
  • Effective Usability
  • Automating Health
  • Medical image interpretation
  • Unpacking health disparities

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Nov 18, 2020
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Health Services Research on Minority Health and Health Disparities (R01- Clinical Trial Optional)

Due dates (non HIV/AIDS related): March 17, 2021; November 17, 2021; March 17, 2022; November 17 2022; February 17, 2023.

The overarching purpose of this FOA is to promote research to generate new knowledge to improve health care access, delivery, utilization and quality, and health outcomes of racial and ethnic minority populations and other groups affected by health disparities. Research encouraged under this FOA includes the examination of population-specific clinical presentation and/or manifestation of diseases and their complications within the context of health care settings; services within health care systems and non-clinical settings linked to health care systems (e.g. personal residences, school-based health centers, the workplace, and criminal justice settings); etiologies and reduction of health care disparities; structure and organization of health care systems and coordination of health care; impact of healthcare and non-healthcare policies on health care and health disparities; and system-wide interventions or multi-level interventions.

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Oct 5, 2020
Friday, December 31, 2021 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Pioneering Ideas: Exploring the Future to Build a Culture of Health

*No deadline to submit. Proposals are accepted on an ongoing basis.

Awards do not have an explicit funding range. 2019 awards averaged $315,031 and were 1-3 years in length.

Pioneering Ideas: Exploring the Future to Build a Culture of Health seeks proposals that are primed to influence health equity in the future. We are interested in ideas that address any of these four areas of focus: Future of Evidence; Future of Social Interaction; Future of Food; Future of Work. Additionally, we welcome ideas that might fall outside of these four focus areas, but which offer unique approaches to advancing health equity and our progress toward a Culture of Health.

We want to hear from scientists, anthropologists, artists, urban planners, community leaders—anyone, anywhere who has a new or unconventional idea that could alter the trajectory of health, and improve health equity and well-being for generations to come. The changes we seek require diverse perspectives and cannot be accomplished by any one person, organization or sector.

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Jun 11, 2020
Friday, December 31, 2021 ECMC Foundation Grants Promote Post-Secondary Education Initiatives in College Success and Career Readiness

Awards can be up to $400,000.

LOI required and accepted on a rolling basis. Only invited LOIs may submit a full proposal.

The ECMC Foundation works to improve post-secondary outcomes for students from underserved backgrounds nationwide. The Foundation makes investments in two focus areas: The College Success category aims to increase the number of students from historically and presently underserved backgrounds who persist through and graduate from an institution of higher education with a bachelor's degree. The Career Readiness category aims to improve post-secondary career and technical education outcomes for students from underserved backgrounds. The Foundation is currently giving priority to requests that address the immediate challenges and opportunities arising from the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Jun 11, 2020
Tuesday, February 1, 2022 National Science Foundation Mid-Career Advancement

Eligibility: Must be of Associate Professor rank

Mid-career researchers in particular are at a critical career stage where they need to advance their research programs to ensure long-term productivity and creativity but are often constrained by service, teaching, or other activities that limit the amount of time devoted to research. The MCA offers an opportunity for researchers at the Associate Professor rank (or equivalent) to substantively enhance and advance their research program through synergistic and mutually beneficial partnerships, typically at an institution other than their home institution. Projects that envision new insights on existing problems or identify new but related problems previously inaccessible without new methodology or expertise from other fields are encouraged. he MCA is the only cross-directorate NSF program specifically aimed at providing protected time and resources to established scientists and engineers targeted at the mid-career (Associate Professor rank or equivalent) stage. Participating programs in the Directorates for Biological Sciences (BIO), Geosciences (GEO), Engineering (ENG), Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE), and Education and Human Resources (EHR) will accept MCA proposals. PIs are encouraged to discuss the suitability of their MCA proposal with a program officer from the appropriate directorate (see https://www.nsf.gov/bio/MCA_contacts.jsp).

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Oct 20, 2020
Monday, February 14, 2022 National Science Foundation Integrative Strategies for Understanding Neural and Cognitive Systems (NCS)

Award sizes and durations vary.

LOI (required) for FRONTIERS proposals- due December 15th yeach year.

Full proposals due Feburary 14, 2022 and February 15, 2023.

NCS will consider two classes of proposals. FOUNDATIONS awards will support high-risk, high-payoff projects that advance the foundationsof one or more NCS focus areas. FRONTIERS awards (FY2021 and FY2023 competitions only) will support ambitious, highly integrative,interdisciplinary projects that advance and connect multiple integrative research threads to tackle challenges that would be intractable withouta high level of collaboration and coordination.Community-driven efforts such as workshops or synthesis papers are also encouraged, to map out new frontiers at the interface ofneuroscience and other disciplines that could reshape brain research and its applications.

This program calls for innovative, convergent, boundary-crossing proposals that can best capture those opportunities and map out newresearch frontiers. NSF seeks proposals that pursue high-value scientific and technical risks by transcending the perspectives and approachestypical of disciplinary research efforts. This cross-directorate program is one element of NSF’s participation in the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative (https://www.nsf.gov/brain/). NSF envisions a connected portfolio oftransformative, integrative projects that create synergistic links across investigators and communities, yielding novel ways of tackling thechallenges of understanding the brain in action and in context.

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Feb 9, 2021
Tuesday, March 22, 2022 National Institutes of Health (NIH) NCMRR Early Career Research Award (R03 Clinical Trial Optional)

R03 Awards are up to $50,000 per year for two (2) years.

Deadlines are March 30, 2021 and March 30, 2022.

The National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR) Early Career Research (ECR) Award (R03) is intended to support both basic and clinical research from rehabilitation scientists who are establishing independent research careers. The research must be focused on one or more of the areas within the biomedical and behavioral mission of NCMRR: pathophysiology and management of chronically injured nervous and musculoskeletal systems (including stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and orthopedic conditions); repair and recovery of motor and cognitive function; functional plasticity, adaptation, and windows of opportunity for rehabilitative interventions; rehabilitative strategies involving pharmaceutical, stimulation, and neuroengineering approaches, exercise, motor training, and behavioral modifications; pediatric rehabilitation; secondary conditions associated with chronic disabilities; improved diagnosis, assessment, and outcome measures; and development of orthotics, prosthetics, and other assistive technologies and devices. The NCMRR ECR Award R03 grant mechanism supports different types of projects including secondary analysis of existing data; small, self-contained research projects; development of research methodology; translational research; outcomes research; and development of new technology. Irrespective of the type of project, the intent of the NCMRR ECR Award R03 is for the Program Director(s)/Principal Investigator(s) (PD(s)/PI(s)) to obtain sufficient preliminary data for a subsequent R01 application.

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Dec 8, 2020